Habitat: Rocks

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Showing 1-25 of 131 records

Mountain Ash

Flower: White with cream-coloured anthers. Fruit: Tight clusters of red berries. Leaves: Deciduous. Similar to Common Ash leaves. Pinnate with toothed leaflets.

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Water Avens

Flower: Flowers borne on long stalks. Pink petals are notched and rounded. Dark red sepals are bell-shaped and nodding, 15mm wide. Fruit: Hooked fruits form a bur-like head. Leaves: Lower leaves are pinnate. The leaves on the stems are 3-lobed with small stipules at their bases.

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Limestone Bedstraw

Flower: The small flowers of Limestone Bedstraw are 4-petalled and grow in tight, domed clusters. This plant is similar to Heath Bedstraw but Limestone Bedstraw is more mat-forming with creamier white petals. Fruit: 2-parted nutlet with tiny dome-shaped warts. Leaves: A very low growing flower with unstalked narrow leaves in whorls of 7 to 8. The leaves are more pointed than the similar-looking Heath Bedstraw. The hairs on the leaf margins point backwards with Lime...

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Birdsfoot

Flower: Pale pink with darker pink streaks. The wings of the flowers are white and the keels are yellow. Fruit: Curved, beaded, roundish and hairless seedpods with up to 9 segments. When 2 or 3 of the seedpods are together the seedpods resemble birds feet which is where Birdsfoot gets its name from. Leaves: An sprawling annual flower with 7 to 13 pairs of oblong leaflets per leaf.

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Hairy Bittercress

Flower: Tiny and forming clusters at the top. 4 white petals with 4 yellow stamens. Counting the number of stamens is perhaps the most reliable way to distinguish this flower from the almost identical Wavy Bi... Fruit: Long and slender seed pods that split open when ripe. Leaves: Basal rosette, anything up to 9 inches long. Compound leaves with alternate leaflets that have one leaf per node along the main upright stem. The leaves persist throughout the winter months.

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Ivy Broomrape

Flower: Cream-coloured, up to 2cm, sometimes hairy, yellow stamens. Fruit: An egg-shaped capsule. Leaves: Without any leaves. The plant has no green pigment and is parasitic on Ivy. However, the stems bear many large and pointed fleshy scales.

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Thyme Broomrape

Flower: The tubular flowers are yellowish-white and tinged reddish-purple, measuring between 1.5 and 2cm in size. Sometimes the flowers are white. The stamens are hairy below and the stigmas are tinged red. T... Fruit: The fruit is a capsule. Leaves: There are no leaves. Instead Thyme Broomrape has scales. The stems are yellowish-white, tinged red or purple (like the flowers). Thyme Broomrape is also covered in many short, downy hairs.

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Salad Burnet

Flower: Oval burgundy-coloured flower heads on long stalks. Fruit: An achene which is a small one seeded dry, ridged nut. Leaves: Pinnate, having up to 12 pairs of toothed leaflets.

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Common Butterwort

Flower: Violet, on long stalks and up to 2cm. Diverging lower lip and a pointed spur. Fruit: Brownish-yellow capsule, ovate, with numerous small brown seeds. Leaves: Yellow-green star-shaped basal rosette with margins curled upwards. 3 to 6 succulent leaves, each up to 8cm long. Butterwort is an insectivorous plant. The leaves feel sticky to touch because the leaf...

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Red Campion

Flower: 5 rose-pink notched petals, up to 2.5cm. Flowers range in colour from dark red to pale pink depending on geographic location. Fruit: An ovoid capsule with 10 curved back teeth after becoming ripe. The capsule contains numerous seeds. Leaves: The dark green leaves are untoothed and appear in opposite pairs. They are lanceolate, pointed and with long winged stalks.

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Sea Campion

Flower: 5 white overlapping petals with broader sepals and often solitary, up to 2.5cm. Sometimes tinged slightly pink. Fruit: A capsule with down-turned teeth. Leaves: Dark green, smooth and waxy leaves, forming a carpet over the ground. Arranged in opposite pairs along the stem.

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Climbing Corydalis

Flower: Pale yellow clusters. Individual flowers up to 6mm long. Fruit: An ovate, or cylindrical capsule. Leaves: Small greyish-green leaves with tendrils attached to the ends of leaf stems. The long-stalked leaves have 3 to 5 leaflets.

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Yellow Corydalis

Flower: Rich yellow dense spikes appearing opposite one another under the leaves. The flowers themselves are small, yellow and trumpet-like in shape. Fruit: A slender pod, or capsule, up to 2cm long. The pods hang downwards but as they ripen they curve upwards then split open to reveal their black, shiny seeds. Leaves: Pale green or greyish. Bipinnate.

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Wall Cotoneaster

Flower: Pink with white anthers, up to 5mm. Fruit: Orange-red berries. Leaves: Small, pointed leaves that are shiny on both sides. Dark green on the upper surfaces and paler beneath, turning red in autumn. The leaves are positioned tightly together and are close to the branches....

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Entire-leaved Cotoneaster

Flower: Up to 15mm across with spreading petals. The anthers are red to purple in colour. Approximately 20 stamens per flower. Fruit: The deep red berries are globular and contain 2 stones each. Up to 1cm across. In fruit from October to December. Bird-sown. Leaves: A sprawling shrub with tiny oblong leaves, up to 1.5cm long. The dark green, glossy leaves have inrolled margins and are blunt-tipped. A common garden species which has become widely naturalised.

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Bearberry Cotoneaster

Flower: Flowers appear in abundance. They are small, white and have purple anthers. Fruit: Bright red, solitary berries, up to 7mm in diameter. The fruit persist well into the winter months. Leaves: A crawling, dense, dwarf (usually) evergreen shrub. Small, leathery, elliptical, pointed leaves with a prominent midrib. The leaves turn purple in autumn.

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Common Cow-wheat

Flower: Annual. Flowers in pairs with leaf-like bracts at the bottom, pale to deep yellow, sometimes tinged pink, up to 2cm. Fruit: Elliptical, oval, flattened capsule, carrying 4 seeds, later splitting on one side. Seeds are dispersed by ants. The botanical name of 'Melampyrum' is derived from the Greek 'melas' (black) and 'pyros... Leaves: Opposite, linear-lanceolate leaves which are nearly stalkless. Leaf bracts have long teeth at the base.

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Dovesfoot Cranesbill

Flower: 5 notched pinkish-purple petals, up to 1.5cm across. The similar-looking Shining Cranesbill has unnotched petals. All 10 stamens have crimson-coloured anthers. The 5 sepals are shorter than the petals. Fruit: Elongated, slender seed pod, beak-shaped. Leaves: Divided into 5 to 7 wedge-shaped lobes. Borne either singly on the stem, or in opposite pairs. Long-stalked.

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Shining Cranesbill

Flower: Deep pink, 5 unnotched petals, up to 1.5cm across. Yellow stigma. Pollinated by insects. Fruit: The ridged fruit pods are long and pointed, just like a 'crane's bill'. Leaves: Glossy, round or kidney-shaped, 5-lobed leaves. Not hairy. Leaves are often red. Long-stalked and in opposite pairs along the stem.

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Bloody Cranesbill

Flower: Bright red or purple flowers, but occasionally pink or white. The flowers have 5 dark purple-veined petals and are usually overlapping and unnotched, but occasionally they are shallowly notched. Flowe... Fruit: A drooping seed capsule borne from a nodding flower bud, sometimes turning red in autumn. Leaves: Small, deep and narrowly cut leaves consisting of 5 to 7 lobes. The leaves are hairy but not as hairy as those that appear on the flower buds and stems. The leaves often turn red in autumn.

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Thale Cress

Flower: Flowers, 2 to 4mm in diameter. Insect-pollinated. Fruit: Cylindrical pods. Shepherd's Purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris) is similar in appearance but the pods make them easy to tell apart. Leaves: A hairy annual flower with lanceolate leaves, sometimes toothed. The lower leaves form a basal rosette and the upper leaves are stalkless but do not clasp the stems.

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Red-seeded Dandelion

Flower: Solitary pale yellow flowers, about 1 inch (2.5cm) across. Flowerheads are composed entirely of ray florets. Flowers have between 150 and 200 ray florets. The flowers of Red-seeded Dandelion are small... Fruit: The fruit of Dandelions are known as achenes. It consists of a single oblong seed tipped by a feathery ring of hairs. The Red-seeded Dandelion can be easily distinguished from Common Dandelion in that... Leaves: All leaves are basal. They measure up to 10 inches (25cm) long and 1.5 inches (4cm wide). Deeply pinnate, backward-pointing, triangular but narrow leaf lobes. The lobes are pointed at the tips. Perenn...

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Yellow Day-lily

Flower: Lemon yellow trumpet-shaped flowers, appearing in clusters. Up to 9cm across. Pollinated by insects. Fruit: The fruit is a capsule. Leaves: A clump-forming perennial. The mid-green leaves are narrow, up to 6.5cm long and 1.5cm wide. All leaves are basal leaves.

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Dewberry

Flower: The white flowers are are up to 1 inch in diameter. Pollinated by insects. Fruit: Dull blue, fleshy, waxy berries consisting of many segments known as drupes (or drupelets). Dewberry may be confused with the much more common Blackberry plant, a.k.a. Bramble. The berries of the Dewb... Leaves: Alternate, trefoil and hairy leaves. Stalked and serrated. The branches of the Dewberry plant are more scrambling than those of Blackberry. The Blackberry is taller and more upright.

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Dropwort

Flower: The flowers are similar-looking to Meadowsweet but are in looser clusters and larger, each flower growing up to 15mm across and having 5 to 6 creamy white petals, often reddish. Fruit: Groups of softly hairy nutlets. Each nutlet measuring up to 4cm across. Leaves: Several finely-cut, crowded basal leaflets, darker in colour than Meadowsweet. Fern-like in appearance, hence the plants alternative name of Fern-leaf Dropwort. Leaflets are in pairs of 8 to 10.

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