Habitat: Heathland

Search

[?]

Open the Advanced Search
1
2 3 4 5
Showing 1-25 of 101 records

Mountain Ash

Flower: White with cream-coloured anthers. Fruit: Tight clusters of red berries. Leaves: Deciduous. Similar to Common Ash leaves. Pinnate with toothed leaflets.

[view all information]

Garden Asparagus

Flower: Bell-shaped, pale green or yellowish flowers. Pollinated by bees. Fruit: A small, red berry, up to 1cm across. The seeds ripen in September and October. Leaves: A perennial herb with an erect, single stem. The shoots are sometimes known as 'spears'.

[view all information]

Aspen

Flower: Male and female catkins are green, and are borne on different trees. Both male and female catkins look alike, however later on the male catkins become dangly and the females remain firm. Fruit: Long hanging conical capsules develop on the catkins. Leaves: Deciduous. The stalked leaves of the Aspen are heart-shaped with wavy edges and have whitish undersides. Their shape causes them to shiver and tremble in the wind, giving the tree a distinctive quiver...

[view all information]

European Bog Asphodel

Flower: Deep yellow spike of flowers, often tinged orange. Flowers are star-like with 6 petals and orange anthers. Fruit: Egg-shaped and bright orange. Leaves: Long and slender, grass-like.

[view all information]

Yellow Azalea

Flower: Funnel-shaped, bright yellow flowers, up to 5cm across. Flowers appear together in dense clusters of 5 to 25. Pollinated by insects. Fruit: A dry, woody seed capsule, containing several minute seeds. Leaves: A bushy deciduous shrub whose leaves are oblong and turn red, purple or orange in autumn. Commonly seen as a garden plant in the British Isles but sometimes seen bird-sown in woods and on moorland. Th...

[view all information]

Wild Basil

Flower: The lilac, mauve, purple or pink flowers are in whorls and are found mostly at the top of the stems. 2-lipped. 4 or 5 lobed. Insect-pollinated. Fruit: A one-seeded nutlet. The seeds ripen in August and September. Leaves: Pointed, oval and slightly blunt-toothed, apple green leaves with prominent curved veins. Leaves are either stalkless or short-stalked. Square stems. A hairy perennial.

[view all information]

Heath Bedstraw

Flower: Tiny, white, forming dense clusters, 4 petals. Fruit: Nutlets are brown and ovoid, hairless and with tiny dome-shaped warts. Leaves: Sharply pointed. Edges have minute forward pointing prickles. In whorls of 5-8 along the main stem.

[view all information]

Betony

Flower: Dense pink to purple flower spike. Fruit: After the flowers have died off, each flower leaves behind four 3-sided, smooth, brown nutlets at the bottom of the calyx. Leaves: Bluntly toothed, oval, stalked leaves, mostly in basal rosettes. Some paired leaves along the stem.

[view all information]

Bilberry

Flower: One or two reddish-pink bell-shaped flowers on short stalks at leaf bases. Fruit: Small, round, dark blue, flat-topped berries. No larger than 1cm in diameter. Leaves: Small, light green and short-stalked oval to elliptical leaves with netted veins. Leaf margins are finely serrated.

[view all information]

Downy Birch

Flower: Male and female catkins appear on the same tree. Erect female catkins are shorter and green. Male catkins hang loosely in groups of 2-4. Often hybridizes with Silver Birch making identification tricky. Fruit: Small dry one-sided winged fruits, called 'achenes'. Leaves: Deciduous. Ovate, pointed and with serrated margins. Light green in spring, darkening and then turning yellow or orange in autumn. Leaves are often hairy underneath.

[view all information]

Silver Birch

Flower: Male yellow catkins hang loose, female catkins much shorter and erect. Often hybridizes with Downy Birch making identification somewhat difficult at times. Fruit: The female catkins develop hundreds of winged seeds as their fruit. Leaves: Deciduous. Stalked and triangular in shape with doubly serrated margins. Leaves turn yellow in autumn. Downy Birch leaves have got serrated margins only, not doubly serrated as with Silver Birch.

[view all information]

Birdsfoot

Flower: Pale pink with darker pink streaks. The wings of the flowers are white and the keels are yellow. Fruit: Curved, beaded, roundish and hairless seedpods with up to 9 segments. When 2 or 3 of the seedpods are together the seedpods resemble birds feet which is where Birdsfoot gets its name from. Leaves: An sprawling annual flower with 7 to 13 pairs of oblong leaflets per leaf.

[view all information]

Black Bog-rush

Flower: Small, dark brown, flattened spikelets. Fruit: An achene surrounded by a hard white coating. Leaves: Thread-like, unbranched, erect and grows in tight clumps straight out of the ground. The leaves have inrolled margins.

[view all information]

Bracken

Flower: Bracken is a fern so does not have flowers. Instead, it reproduces using spores. Fruit: Spores. Leaves: Large triangular fronds, divided into 3 parts. Each part is bipinnately subdivided. The leaves when young look like 'shepherd's crooks', or 'croziers'. In autumn, the leaves turn yellow-brown and pers...

[view all information]

Common Broom

Flower: Rich yellow, pea-like flowers scattered up the stem, up to 2cm wide and occasionally tinged red. Fruit: Flattened brownish-black pods with hairy edges, up to 4cm long. Leaves: Deciduous. All leaves are minute. The leaves at the bottom of the branches are trefoil and along the stems they are lanceolate.

[view all information]

Thyme Broomrape

Flower: The tubular flowers are yellowish-white and tinged reddish-purple, measuring between 1.5 and 2cm in size. Sometimes the flowers are white. The stamens are hairy below and the stigmas are tinged red. T... Fruit: The fruit is a capsule. Leaves: There are no leaves. Instead Thyme Broomrape has scales. The stems are yellowish-white, tinged red or purple (like the flowers). Thyme Broomrape is also covered in many short, downy hairs.

[view all information]

Alder Buckthorn

Flower: Star-shaped pale green or white flowers. Flowers are up to 4mm in diameter. 5 stamens. Fruit: Green berries, turning red, then later purplish-black. The berries ripen in September. Leaves: Alder Buckthorn is thornless (unlike other Buckthorns). Their leaves are untoothed and alternate along the branches. Each leaf has between 6 and 10 pairs of veins. The leaves turn yellow or red in aut...

[view all information]

Bugloss

Flower: Light blue, bell-shaped flowers with white honeyguides, measuring approximately 5mm across. The petal-tube is curved. Pollinated by bees. Fruit: 4-parted, netted nutlets, about 3mm long. Single-seeded. Leaves: The stems are hairy and bristly. The narrow, pointed leaves are also hairy and warty. The upper leaves clasp their stems. Leaves alternate along the stems. Basal leaves are stalked but the upper leave...

[view all information]

Common Butterwort

Flower: Violet, on long stalks and up to 2cm. Diverging lower lip and a pointed spur. Fruit: Brownish-yellow capsule, ovate, with numerous small brown seeds. Leaves: Yellow-green star-shaped basal rosette with margins curled upwards. 3 to 6 succulent leaves, each up to 8cm long. Butterwort is an insectivorous plant. The leaves feel sticky to touch because the leaf...

[view all information]

Lesser Centaury

Flower: Similar looking to Common Centaury (Centaurium erythraea). The flowers are slightly more red (occasionally white), the petals are smaller and narrower. Lesser Centaury flowers are also longer stalked.... Fruit: A two-sectioned seed capsule. Leaves: Pointed, oval leaves. Basal rosette. More slender and open than Common Centaury. Most common in Southern England. Absent from Scotland.

[view all information]

Common Cow-wheat

Flower: Annual. Flowers in pairs with leaf-like bracts at the bottom, pale to deep yellow, sometimes tinged pink, up to 2cm. Fruit: Elliptical, oval, flattened capsule, carrying 4 seeds, later splitting on one side. Seeds are dispersed by ants. The botanical name of 'Melampyrum' is derived from the Greek 'melas' (black) and 'pyros... Leaves: Opposite, linear-lanceolate leaves which are nearly stalkless. Leaf bracts have long teeth at the base.

[view all information]

Red-seeded Dandelion

Flower: Solitary pale yellow flowers, about 1 inch (2.5cm) across. Flowerheads are composed entirely of ray florets. Flowers have between 150 and 200 ray florets. The flowers of Red-seeded Dandelion are small... Fruit: The fruit of Dandelions are known as achenes. It consists of a single oblong seed tipped by a feathery ring of hairs. The Red-seeded Dandelion can be easily distinguished from Common Dandelion in that... Leaves: All leaves are basal. They measure up to 10 inches (25cm) long and 1.5 inches (4cm wide). Deeply pinnate, backward-pointing, triangular but narrow leaf lobes. The lobes are pointed at the tips. Perenn...

[view all information]

Deergrass

Flower: Egg-shaped spikelets which grow solitary at the top of the stem. Fruit: 3 sided nuts. Leaves: Tussock-forming, dense, erect, stiff leaves with unbranched stems. Basal leaves only.

[view all information]

Hard Fern

Flower: Ferns have spores, flowers are therefore absent. Fruit: The spores on the underside of the fronds can be either yellow, green, brown or black. Leaves: The fronds can either be sterile or fertile. The evergreen, narrow, sterile fronds often lie horizontally across the ground, and the even narrower, taller, fertile fronds are more erect, withering tow...

[view all information]

Broad Buckler Fern

Flower: Ferns do not produce flowers. They reproduce by means of spores. Fruit: Spores ripen in July and August. Leaves: The scales on the stalks are dark, or dark-centred. The dark centred scales are a good feature for identifying this fern. Dark green, spreading 3-pinnate fronds (leaves) which are broadly triangular i...

[view all information]

1
2 3 4 5