Habitat: Waterside

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Common Agrimony

Flower: The flowers of Common Agrimony (Agrimonia eupatoria) found in the UK are small and yellow, arranged in elongated spikes on slender stems. Each individual flower consists of five petals and has a delicate, cup-shaped appearance. The flowers bloom in clusters and are known for their bright, cheerful y... Fruit: The fruit of Common Agrimony (Agrimonia eupatoria) found in the UK is composed of small, burr-like structures containing seeds. These fruits typically develop after the flowering period. They have a rough or prickly exterior, designed with hooks that easily attach to fur or clothing, aiding in the d... Leaves: The leaves of Common Agrimony (Agrimonia eupatoria) found in the UK are compound and alternately arranged along the stem. Each leaf is composed of smaller leaflets arranged in a feather-like or pinnate pattern. The leaflets are serrated along the edges, providing a distinctive appearance. The surfac...

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Common Alder

Flower: Yellow and pendulous (male catkins). Green and oval (female catkins). Male and female catkins present on same tree, and grouped in clusters of 3-8 on each stalk. Fruit: In winter the catkins turn into hard, dark, cone-like fruit which eventually release the seeds. Leaves: Deciduous. Round, dark green, leathery, smooth, serrated edges.

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Italian Alder

Flower: Italian Alder (Alnus cordata) produces small, inconspicuous flowers that are typically arranged in pendulous catkins. These catkins can be either male or female. Male catkins are slender and yellowish-green, and they release pollen into the air. Female catkins are shorter and more cylindrical, with ... Fruit: Italian Alder (Alnus cordata) produces elongated and cylindrical catkins, which are an important part of its reproductive structures. These catkins are typically pendulous, hanging from the branches, and they come in two main types: male and female. Male catkins are usually longer and more slender, ... Leaves: The leaves of the Italian Alder (Alnus cordata) are characterized by their heart-shaped form and serrated edges. These deciduous leaves are typically medium to dark green in color and have a glossy appearance on their upper surface. They are arranged alternately along the branches and can grow to be...

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Allseed

Flower: The small white flowers are short-stalked and appear inside branched clusters. The 4 petals are about as long as the toothed sepals. Fruit: The fruit is a globular seed capsule. Leaves: A well-branched annual with very small, pointed oval leaves. The leaves are in opposite pairs along the stems. Greyish-green, stiff, thread-like, forked, reddish stems.

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Asarabacca

Flower: Pale yellowish-green bell-shaped flowers. No petals. 3 maroon sepals. The flowers are usually hidden beneath the leaves. 12 stamens. Pollinated by flies. Fruit: A 6-parted capsule. Leaves: The leathery, dark green leaves are glossy and kidney-shaped. The leaves measure about 3 inches (7.5cm) across. Evergreen perennial. Asarabacca has a preference for growing in Beech woodland.

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Scottish Asphodel

Flower: Small, greenish-white or yellowish-white flowers in a short but dense terminal spike. 6 petals (3 are actually sepals). 6 stamens. Fruit: A roundish, 3-parted, greyish capsule, up to 3mm long. The seeds are tiny. Leaves: Flattened, hairless, iris-like leaves. Most leaves are basal leaves. They are stalkless and toothless. Up to 3 alternate stem leaves. The leaves are 3 to 7-veined. The erect stems are flat and hairless. Perennial.

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Aunt Eliza

Flower: The orange-brown flowers are about 6cm in length. They are arranged alternately along its zigzagged stems. Fruit: A 3-angled, green capsule, turning brown upon ripening. Leaves: A clump-forming perennial with olive green, deeply pleated, wiry leaves. The plant grows from a corm. Seldom found growing wild in the UK but not unheard of.

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Water Avens

Flower: The flowers of Water Avens are characterized by their nodding, reddish-purple petals. These blooms add a touch of elegance to the plant and typically appear in late spring to mid-summer. Fruit: The fruit of Water Avens consists of small, dry achenes. These one-seeded fruits develop after the flowering period and contribute to the plant's reproductive cycle. Leaves: The basal leaves of Water Avens are pinnate and possess a slightly hairy texture. These toothed leaves contribute to the overall appearance of the plant, forming a lush and green foliage.

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Balm of Gilead

Flower: Pale yellowish-green catkins which appear before the leaves in spring, up to 16cm long. Wind pollinated. Fruit: The seeds are the fruit. They ripen in May. Leaves: The leaf buds are very sticky and resinous. The smooth and hairless leaves are heart-shaped with a pointed tip and finely serrated margins.

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Orange Balsam

Flower: Orange with many blood-red spots. Fruit: Oblong capsules which later become explosive when touched. When the capsules explode, the many seeds within them are scattered and the plant can soon become invasive and out of control. Leaves: Alternate, ovate and stalked. The margins of the leaves are toothed but the teeth are well spaced apart.

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Touch-me-not Balsam

Flower: Touch-me-not Balsam showcases delicate, pale yellow to orange flowers with vivid red or purple spots, creating a charming spectacle in the British countryside. These blossoms, adorned with their distinct markings, gently sway in the breeze, attracting pollinators like bees and butterflies during the... Fruit: The fruit of Touch-me-not Balsam is comprised of elongated seed pods that develop following the flowering period. These pods, known as capsules, are characteristically slender and cylindrical, gradually maturing to a pale green or brown hue. Upon reaching maturity, the pods exhibit a remarkable mech... Leaves: The leaves of Touch-me-not Balsam are broadly oval in shape and feature serrated edges, imparting a distinctive appearance to this native British plant. These verdant foliage adornments are arranged alternately along the stems, creating a lush canopy of greenery in shaded woodlands, damp meadows, an...

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Small Balsam

Flower: Small Balsam features delicate pale yellow blossoms with a distinctive spurred shape. These flowers, native to the UK, thrive in damp woodland areas, showcasing their charming allure along riverbanks and streamsides. 5 stamens. Pollinated by insects. Fruit: The fruit of Small Balsam, native to the UK, is a small, elongated capsule that bursts open when touched, dispersing its seeds. This capsule is typically green in color and contains numerous seeds, contributing to the plant's prolific spread in woodland habitats across the country. Leaves: The leaves of Small Balsam, native to the UK, are ovate to lanceolate in shape, with serrated edges. They are typically a vibrant green colour and have a slightly glossy appearance. The leaves are arranged alternately along the stem and often have a reddish tint on the undersides.

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Arrow Bamboo

Flower: The flowers are never seen in the British Isles. Wind pollinated. Fruit: Never seen in fruit. Leaves: An evergreen perennial plant with large, long, linear, pointed, dark green, grass-like leaves. The stems are cane-like in appearance. Occasionally seen as a garden escape species growing wild in the UK.

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Fen Bedstraw

Flower: Loose clusters of white flowers. Each flower is up to 3mm across. Yellow anthers. Fruit: The fruits are low-domed warts. Leaves: Whorls of leaves in groups of 6 to 10. Leaves are one-veined. The linear leaves have prickly edges. Similar to Marsh Bedstraw (Galium palustre) but Fen Bedstraw often has rougher, purplish leaves. Fen Bedstraw is also a shorter plant.

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Marsh Bedstraw

Flower: Small, white flowers. Up to 4mm in diameter. Fruit: Small, globular fruit, slightly wrinkled. Leaves: Rough-margined leaves, in whorls of 4 to 6. Stems are without prickles. The similar-looking Fen Bedstraw (Galium oliginosum) does not have prickles on the stems. Perennial which sometimes grows in water.

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