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Cherry Plum

Prunus cerasifera

Please keep in mind that it is illegal to uproot a plant without the landowner's consent and care should be taken at all times not to damage wild plants. Wild plants should never be picked for pleasure and some plants are protected by law.
For more information please download the BSBI Code of Conduct PDF document.

Contents

Plant Profile

Flowering Months:
JAN  FEB  MAR  APR  MAY  JUN  JUL  AUG  SEP  OCT  NOV  DEC
Order:
Rosales
Family:
Rosaceae (Rose)
Also in this family:
Acute Leaf-lobed Lady's-mantle, Alpine Cinquefoil, Alpine Lady's-mantle, Ampfield Cotoneaster, Arran Service Tree, Arran Whitebeam, Barren Strawberry, Bastard Agrimony, Bastard Service Tree, Bearberry Cotoneaster, Bird Cherry, Blackthorn, Bloody Whitebeam, Bramble, Bristol Whitebeam, Broad-leaved Whitebeam, Broadtooth Lady's-mantle, Bronze Pirri-pirri-bur, Bullace Plum, Bullate Cotoneaster, Burnet Rose, Catacol Whitebeam, Caucasian Lady's-mantle, Cheddar Whitebeam, Cherry Laurel, Chinese Photinia, Cloudberry, Clustered Lady's-mantle, Common Agrimony, Common Hawthorn, Common Lady's-mantle, Common Medlar, Common Ninebark, Common Whitebeam, Crab Apple, Creeping Chinese Bramble, Creeping Cinquefoil, Crimean Lady's-mantle, Cultivated Apple, Cultivated Pear, Cut-leaved Blackberry, Damson, Devon Whitebeam, Dewberry, Diel's Cotoneaster, Dog Rose, Doward Whitebeam, Dropwort, Elm-leaved Bramble, English Whitebeam, Entire-leaved Cotoneaster, False Salmonberry, Field Rose, Firethorn, Fodder Burnet, Fragrant Agrimony, Franchet's Cotoneaster, Garden Lady's-mantle, Garden Strawberry, Giant Meadowsweet, Glaucous Dog Rose, Goatsbeard Spiraea, Gough's Rock Whitebeam, Great Burnet, Greengage Plum, Grey-leaved Whitebeam, Hairless Lady's-mantle, Hairy Lady's-mantle, Hautbois Strawberry, Himalayan Blackberry, Himalayan Cotoneaster, Himalayan Whitebeam, Hoary Cinquefoil, Hollyberry Cotoneaster, Hupeh Rowan, Hybrid Cinquefoil, Hybrid Geum, Irish Whitebeam, Japanese Cherry, Japanese Quince, Japanese Rose, Jew's Mallow, Juneberry, Lancaster Whitebeam, Late Cotoneaster, Least Lady's-mantle, Least Whitebeam, Leigh Woods Whitebeam, Ley's Whitebeam, Liljefor's Whitebeam, Littleleaf Cotoneaster, Llangollen Whitebeam, Llanthony Whitebeam, Lleyn Cotoneaster, Loganberry, Many-flowered Rose, Margaret's Whitebeam, Marsh Cinquefoil, Meadowsweet, Midland Hawthorn, Mougeot's Whitebeam, Mountain Ash, Mountain Avens, Mountain Sibbaldia, Moupin's Cotoneaster, No Parking Whitebeam, Ocean Spray, Orange Whitebeam, Pale Bridewort, Pale Lady's-mantle, Parsley Piert, Pirri-pirri-bur, Plymouth Pear, Portuguese Laurel, Purple-flowered Raspberry, Quince, Raspberry, Rock Cinquefoil, Rock Lady's-mantle, Rock Whitebeam, Round-leaved Dog Rose, Round-leaved Whitebeam, Rum Cherry, Russian Cinquefoil, Salad Burnet, Sargent's Rowan, Scannell's Whitebeam, Service Tree, Sharp-toothed Whitebeam, Sherard's Downy Rose, Shining Lady's-mantle, Ship Rock Whitebeam, Short-styled Rose, Shrubby Cinquefoil, Silver Lady's-mantle, Silverweed, Slender Parsley Piert, Slender-spined Bramble, Small-flowered Sweetbriar, Small-leaved Sweetbriar, Soft Downy Rose, Somerset Whitebeam, Sorbaria, Sour Cherry, Southern Downy Rose, Southern Lady's-mantle, Spineless Acaena, Spring Cinquefoil, St. Lucie's Cherry, Steeplebush, Stern's Cotoneaster, Stirton's Whitebeam, Stone Bramble, Sulphur Cinquefoil, Swedish Service Tree, Swedish Whitebeam, Sweet Briar, Symond's Yat Whitebeam, Tengyueh Cotoneaster, Thimbleberry, Thin-leaved Whitebeam, Tibetan Cotoneaster, Tormentil, Trailing Tormentil, Tree Cotoneaster, Trefoil Cinquefoil, Twin-cliffs Whitebeam, Two-spined Acaena, Wall Cotoneaster, Water Avens, Waterer's Cotoneaster, Waxy Lady's-mantle, Welsh Cotoneaster, Welsh Whitebeam, White Burnet, White's Whitebeam, White-stemmed Bramble, Wild Cherry, Wild Pear, Wild Plum, Wild Service Tree, Wild Strawberry, Willmott's Whitebeam, Willow-leaved Bridewort, Willow-leaved Cotoneaster, Wineberry, Wood Avens, Wye Whitebeam, Yellow-flowered Strawberry
Type:
Deciduous tree
Life Cycle:
Perennial
Maximum Size:
9 metres tall
Habitats:
Gardens, hedgerows, roadsides, woodland.

Flower:
֍
White, 5 petals
 
White (sometimes tinged pink), solitary flowers. Usually one of the first flowers to appear in springtime. Pollinated by bees.
Fruit:
Cherry-like, globular fruit, starting off green and then turning yellow or red, 2 cm in diameter. The fruit appears in bunches of 1 to 5. The seeds ripen in August and September.
Leaves:
Glossy green, oval leaves with finely serrated margins. The undersides are covered in fine hairs but the tops are hairless. Branches do not have spines.
Other Names:
Myrobalan Plum, Newport Cherry Plum, Pissard Plum.
Frequency (UK):
Common  

Other Information

Summary

Prunus cerasifera, commonly known as cherry plum or myrobalan plum, is a small deciduous tree or large shrub from the rose family (Rosaceae). It is native to Europe, Asia and North Africa. It is cultivated for its fruit, which is used to make jams, jellies, and other preserves. The fruit is a small, round, red to purple drupe with a yellowish flesh. The leaves are simple, oval or oblong, with serrated edges and are dark green in color. The flowers are small, white or pinkish, and produced in clusters before the leaves appear. The tree is hardy and adaptable to different soil types and it is also drought tolerant. It is also used as an ornamental plant in gardens due to its showy flowers, and it's purple leaves cultivars.

Blog

The Cherry Plum tree, also known as Prunus cerasifera, is a beautiful ornamental tree that is native to Asia and Europe. It belongs to the Rosaceae family and is closely related to other well-known fruit trees such as plums, apricots, and cherries. In this blog post, we will discuss the characteristics and cultivation of the Cherry Plum tree.

Characteristics

The Cherry Plum tree is a deciduous tree that can grow up to 20-30 feet in height and 15-20 feet in width. It has a round to oval shape and a dense, spreading canopy. The tree produces stunning showy flowers in early spring before its leaves appear. The flowers are typically white or pink, with five petals, and grow in clusters. The Cherry Plum tree's leaves are simple, alternate, and ovate or elliptic in shape, with serrated margins. The leaves are usually green, but some cultivars have reddish or purple foliage. The tree produces small, edible fruit that resembles cherry, but is actually a type of plum.

Cultivation

The Cherry Plum tree is a hardy and adaptable tree that can grow in a wide range of soil types, including sandy, loamy, or clay soils. It prefers well-drained soil that is moderately fertile and slightly acidic. The tree can tolerate drought and some shade but prefers full sun exposure. It is also resistant to most pests and diseases.

Propagation of the Cherry Plum tree can be done through seed, but it is more commonly propagated through cuttings or grafting onto rootstock. It is important to note that Cherry Plum trees can cross-pollinate with other members of the Prunus genus, such as plums and cherries. This can result in hybrid fruit with unique flavors and characteristics.

Uses

The Cherry Plum tree is commonly used as an ornamental tree in gardens, parks, and landscapes. Its showy flowers and colorful foliage make it an attractive addition to any outdoor space. The fruit of the tree can be eaten fresh or used in cooking, such as making jams or jellies. The tree's wood is also used for making furniture, utensils, and musical instruments.

In conclusion, the Cherry Plum tree is a beautiful and versatile tree that is a great addition to any garden or landscape. Its stunning flowers, colorful foliage, and edible fruit make it a popular choice among gardeners and homeowners. With its hardiness and adaptability, the Cherry Plum tree is a tree that can thrive in a wide range of environments and is sure to provide years of beauty and enjoyment.


Cherry Plum Facts

Here are some additional interesting facts about the Cherry Plum tree:

  1. History and Origin: The Cherry Plum tree has been cultivated for centuries and has a long history of use in traditional medicine. It is believed to have originated in Asia, but it has been introduced to many parts of the world, including Europe, North America, and Australia.

  2. Varieties: There are many varieties of Cherry Plum trees available, each with its unique characteristics. Some popular varieties include 'Atropurpurea', which has deep purple leaves, and 'Nigra', which has dark purple fruit.

  3. Wildlife Attraction: The Cherry Plum tree is an excellent source of food for many types of wildlife, including birds and small mammals. The fruit is also attractive to bees and other pollinators, making it a great addition to any wildlife garden.

  4. Edible Fruit: While the fruit of the Cherry Plum tree is small, it is edible and can be used in a variety of ways. It is often used to make jams, jellies, and baked goods. The fruit can be eaten fresh but is generally considered to be sour or tart.

  5. Traditional Medicine: In traditional medicine, the Cherry Plum tree has been used to treat a variety of ailments, including diarrhea, coughs, and fever. The bark of the tree has been used as a diuretic, and the fruit has been used as a laxative.

In conclusion, the Cherry Plum tree is a fascinating and versatile tree that is appreciated for its beauty, wildlife attraction, and edible fruit. Whether you are a gardener looking for an attractive tree for your landscape or someone interested in traditional medicine, the Cherry Plum tree is definitely worth considering. With its hardiness, adaptability, and numerous uses, it is a tree that is sure to provide years of enjoyment and satisfaction.


Blog continued

The Cherry Plum tree is a valuable addition to any garden or landscape. Not only does it provide a beautiful display of showy flowers and colorful foliage, but it also attracts wildlife and produces edible fruit. The tree's hardiness and adaptability make it an excellent choice for many different environments, from urban gardens to rural landscapes.

One of the most striking features of the Cherry Plum tree is its showy flowers, which bloom in early spring before the leaves appear. The flowers are typically white or pink, with five petals, and grow in clusters. They provide a beautiful display of color and can be a stunning addition to any landscape.

In addition to its flowers, the Cherry Plum tree also produces small, edible fruit. The fruit is similar in appearance to a cherry, but it is actually a type of plum. While the fruit is small, it can be used in a variety of ways, including making jams, jellies, and baked goods. The fruit is generally considered to be sour or tart but can be quite delicious when prepared correctly.

The Cherry Plum tree is also an excellent source of food for many types of wildlife. Birds and small mammals are attracted to the tree's fruit, while bees and other pollinators are drawn to its flowers. By planting a Cherry Plum tree, you can help support local wildlife and create a thriving ecosystem in your garden or landscape.

Finally, the Cherry Plum tree has a long history of use in traditional medicine. The tree's bark has been used as a diuretic, and the fruit has been used as a laxative. While modern medicine has largely replaced these traditional uses, the Cherry Plum tree remains an important part of traditional medicine practices in some cultures.

In conclusion, the Cherry Plum tree is a valuable and versatile tree that is appreciated for its beauty, wildlife attraction, and edible fruit. Whether you are a gardener looking to add a beautiful tree to your landscape or someone interested in traditional medicine, the Cherry Plum tree is definitely worth considering. With its hardiness, adaptability, and numerous uses, it is a tree that is sure to provide years of enjoyment and satisfaction.


Distribution Map

Reproduced by kind permission of the BSBI.

Click to open an Interactive Map